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Archive for January 23rd, 2012

Progress Report, in which I impart the wisdom of experience

Another 4K of Apocalypse Pictures Presents is (ahem) in the books.  Magic Meter is magic:

Missed the weekly goal by 1K, but you know, I’ve had worse weeks.  Meanwhile, I’m just about done with Act Two, and will be moving into a pretty short Act Three.  This tells me I’ll have some structural issues to deal with in the rewrite, but for now, I’m just trying to finish the damned thing.

You might think that I’d be charging headlong toward the ending.  Yeah, not so much.  I’ve reached that point in the process.  You know one I mean:  it’s all become drudgery, and pointless, and utter crap.

And yet, past experience has taught me that for all I know, I’m writing some of my most brilliant stuff here.

Either that, or it really is all crap.  Past experience has taught me that, too.

Here’s a snippet, so that you may decide for yourself:

As sunset neared, uproar reigned in the Hills.

Gil had wondered how he, Florence, and Jazmine would get back to Catherine’s place.  He needn’t have worried.  The brush fires had sparked an evacuation of the affected areas to the south and east, as was evidenced by the steady stream of residents they came upon making their way westward, carrying their belongings.  Berkowitz’s men worked to keep them moving, barking orders, coordinating foot and vehicular traffic.  Every time they neared another pack of evacuees, Gil, Florence, and Jazmine would hang back, waiting for them to pass.  If the group looked large enough, they would change their route, winding through backyards and deserted side streets.  But the evacuees were noisy and disorganized enough that they were easily avoided.

A burnt smell hung in the air.  By dusk, what had once been several distinct plumes to the east had merged into a great smoke cloud that towered over the Hills.  Haze made the setting sun into a fuzzy, brilliant orange blur, as if the entire western horizon had also caught fire.  He couldn’t help thinking that a panoramic shot of the landscape, panning from the sunset to the fires would look great in the movie.

No updates for Write Club.

Onward.